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reduction. the u.s. recognized in 2011 there was a 13% reduction. the u.n. confirms that there was a least a 12% reduction. in colombia, there were slight increases. both countries have both doubled the amount. there are other yardsticks that are better and measuring the quality of cocoa production. that is quality of life for farmers. what we found is a dynamic that has just begun to take hold. thomas has to be guarantees -- farmers have to be guaranteed. they can branch out to other things. >> is this sustainable long- term? is it enough to sustain in the long term although there may be short-term reductions. >> the forces would rip out the cocoa crops and people would have nothing to eat and people would credit leave replant. -- quicly replant. the price of coca -- it is these kinds of alternatives that give this a much better chance of being sustainable. it improves the quality of life. >> with me to further discuss bolivia going its own way in controlling its coca leaf production is the senior associate for drug policy at the washington and latin american group. then the director of t
that they're ready to carry out a nuclear test in response to a u.n. sanction's resolution. analysts at johns hopkins university posted a satellite photo online of the nuclear test site. they were taken between november and december. analysts believe the photos confirm their approach to a command bunker some 150 meters north of the entrance. they believe it houses equipment to control a detonator and to communicate with authorities in pyongyang. they also say that a device to measure radiation levels and a radio system have been installed. north korean authoritiesd their readiness to conduct another test. the security council condemned north korea's december rocket launch. >>> north korean authorities are warning south korea of counter measures if it takes part in u.n. sanctions. >>> a north korean statement criticizes south korea for pressing other nations to adopt the u.n. resolution condemning last month's rocket launch. it says sanctions amount to a declaration of war and warns of what it calls strong physical countermeasures if the south koreans participate in them directly. aut
out in the open on the website, and so u.n., european union, american bar association, dean said most law schools at american universities, all there on the internet. people are not talking about world government. this form of transnational government. so let's look at for people, just some quick views of players who have given a taste of the concept global governance. strobe talbott is currently the president of the brookings institution, a major think tank in washington. former secretary of state as a journalist for "time" magazine in the 1990s, talbott wrote an article in which he welcomes supernatural political authority. he said, how back in the next hundred years nationhood as we know it will be obsolete in all states will recognize a single global authority. he concluded by saying that his devolution of power, upwards towards supranational and downwards toward units of administration is basically a positive phenomenon. harold koh is currently the legal adviser at the u.s. state department. in other words, he advises the president on what international law is. he was dean of the
america back from the fiscal clift. 60,000 people have died in the civil war and the u.n. blames the outside world for failing to stop this violence. the ghost town of fukushima. we speak to the forgotten victims of japan's nuclear disaster including those who risked all to help. welcome to world news america. financial markets around the world have a good start to the new year after american politicians come up with a last- minute deal to avoid falling back into recession. the tortures nature of the political negotiations suggest washington is going to struggle over future economic decisions. today's excitement might be short-lived. >> smiles of relief on wall street today as the new york stock exchange reopens. relief as a last-minute deal averted a looming economic crisis. markets around the world were cheered by the news. in asia, shares jumped and the pattern was repeated across europe. this was the moment of truth late last night, the first and new year's day vote in congress since the korean war 60 years ago. a vote on a compromise agreement that neither party loves. >> vi
south korea of counter measures if it takes part in u.n. sanctions. >>> a north korean statement criticizes south korea for pressing other nations to adopt the u.n. resolution condemning last month's rocket launch. it says sanctions amount to a declaration of war and warns of what it calls strong physical countermeasures if the south koreans participate in them directly. authorities in pyongyang say there will be no more bilatera discussions on the issue of denuclearization on the korean peninsula. they add a 1992 joint declaration on that issue is no longer valid. north korea's words and possible actions are raising the heat in east asia, along with threatening another nuclear test. authorities in the reclusive nation are promising more rocket launches. japanese defense ministry analysts say the north now have a missing that could travel more than 10,000 kilometers, far enough to reach the u.s. west coast. japan and other countries north korean officials say they used a rocket to put a satellite into orbit but japan and other countries believe they were testing ballistic missile
war and the u.n. blames the outside world for failing to stop this violence. the ghost town of fukushima. we speak to thetten or fvigotten victims of japan's nuclear disaster including those who risked all to help. welcome to world news america. financial markets around the world have a good start to the new year after american politicians come up with a last- minute deal to avoid falling back into recession. the tortures nature of the political negotiations suggest washington is going to struggle over future economic decisions. today's excitement might be short-lived. >> smiles of relief on wall street today as the new york stock exchange reopens. relief as a last-minute deal averted a looming economic crisis. markets around the world were cheered by the news. in asia, shares jumped and the pattern was repeated across europe. this was the moment of truth late last night, the first and new year's day vote in congress since the korean war 60 years ago. a vote on a compromise agreement that neither party loves. >> virtually no 1 believes that what we have before us tonight is
n u n cam cambio m u y rf cambio m u y rf f u e t e r fuerte . >> te sie n tes ca ns a da . > > o t ro si nt Íntoma c u r io s o , e s que ca d a v e z hay m asÁs p e r so na s q ue d i dice n q ue s e de spier ta n t o d as l las m a d r ug qa las m a d r ug qa a da s a la mis m a ho ra . >> t ie ene q ue v er con el i mp a c t o de l so l , y e s s l a h ora de d on de v i en en l os Ángeles a v i s it ar . >> di ce n que a l te n er l os c an canalec canales a b ie rtos, hay pel i g r o q que di me n s io nes neg a t i v a s n os a f afe c t e n , ella lla d i ce q ue c a da d iaÍa s e e st stÁn manife s ta nd o m asÁs . >> s on s er es de d i m en c siÓn n e g a t i negativ a , co m o tb ambiÉn de d i me n s dimensio n es p os i t i vas y de l u z . >> m i e nt r as mÁs no s li mp i e m o s , m me jo r v amo s a e s t ar . >> e s ts os e fe ct iv o s o s fg i s ic o
a boy who feels betrayed by the world. the u.n. intervenes in the south china seas. police officers in mexico say they have had enough. israelis are voting in their general election. binyamin netanyahu is a clear favorite to win another term in office. we're covering the election for us of there. is it shaping up? .> we're in west jerusalem there have been a steady trickle of voters coming and. sraelis are is re eligible to vote. it looks like to be a good turnout. the question is to what extend binyamin netanyahu can claim a mandate for victory. prime minister binyamin netanyahu casting his ballot. >> want them to succeed. >> he has a commanding lead in all polls. there are new kids on israel's political bloc. >> he is trying to make this campaign a personal campaign on his ability to be the prime minister. yes or no? specific questions about policies. >> the votes have been dominating the headlines. the likud party ran on a single ballad. have lost support to this man. they appealed to the rising nationalism in israeli politics concentrated in jewish settlements in the occupied we
and was already the poorest country in western hemisphere. a cholera epidemic, widely blamed on international u.n. troops, spread shortly after the earthquake and killed nearly 8000 people. according to reports, only about half the $5.3 billion in promised funding from international donors has been paid out. critics point out even if the money that has been delivered, very little has made it directly to the haitian people the going to international non- governmental organizations, private companies involved in the relief effort. to talk more about the situation, we're joined by author and journalist jonathan katz, the only full-time american reporter in haiti when the earthquake struck port of prince. his new book is called, "the big truck that went by: how the world came to save haiti and left behind a disaster." explains where the massive international relief effort in haiti went wrong. we welcome you to "democracy now!" you were there that day of the earthquake. describe the scene and then what happened, how we have come to this 0.3 years later we're haiti continues to be such a catastrophe. >
. according to the u.n., more than 60,000 people have been killed. the u.n. called the figure truly shocking and said it represented a failure by the outside world to stop the violence. today, opposition activists said that dozens more people were killed by an air strike in damascus. our middle east editor reports. >> this a video came from anti- regime activists in syria. they say it shows the aftermath of a government air strike on a petrol station in the suburbs of damascus. estimates of the dead and this attack, some reports say they included armed rebels, run as high as 50. it is as hard as ever to get accurate information out of syria but almost no foreign observers are in the country and big parts of the country are inaccessible. but now the u.n. human rights office said that they have an accurate total of the dead. it is startlingly bigger than previous estimates. the have an outside specialist to go through casualty lists compiled. they have come out with a list of 59,006 had a 48 dead until november. fully identified by photos and family names. -- they have come out with a list of
recognized representative asking the u.n. to upgrade their international standing. an overwhelming number of nations voted to recognize them as a non-member observer state. they celebrated the news. israel condemned the move. the day after the vote, the government announced the massive settlement plans would move forward. the development would effectively cut the territory in two. united states of the project was "not helpful." tensions over the iranian nuclear program to be most in the spotlight. netanyahu has threatened to launch a preventive strike on iranian nuclear abilities. he told the u.n. that iran could have the means to trade in nuclear bomb as early as this spring. i rise as they will respond to any israeli attack by closing the straight -- iran said they will close the strait of hormuz. they could also launched missiles into israel and they're adding further to the israeli border is in the event of a showdown. western countries have passed multiple rounds of sanctions against by round, but they have stopped short of military confrontation. -- against iran. allies including ge
been shelled. this video appears to show an air strike. the u.n. says donors have helped them raise more than $1.5 million for refugees. 100,000 people have already fled the violence in syria. the number could reach more than 1 million by june. there is also concerned about 2 million syrians who have been internally displaced by the conflict. i moon called the situation in syria a catastrophe that is growing by the day. a figure stands at 700,000. an ambitious target of $1.50 billion, a figure that is a surprise to some u.s. officials that it was met. >> to be able to provide to syrian refugees better protection, that your assistance in relation to shelter, food, health. >> the $1.50 billion the u.n. and ask for is just for the next six months. that is the largest amount they have ever need in u.s. history. there is no end in sight for the problems in syria. they may have to have another conference like this in a matter of months. the progress raised for raising humanitarian funds is a conflict or the humanitarian community to stop the killing. should those countries sitting on the
governed or ungoverned. >> good to talk to you. thank you very much. the u.n. is warning of a growing crisis in neighboring mali. there was a focus of heavy fighting. >> fleeing the violence that is engulfing much of their country, these people are from the strategically important town. it has been the focus of much of the recent fighting, with conflicting reports about who is in control. those who have escaped the violence there are grateful to have made it this far. >> people are terrified. often, they are in a horrible position, without having brought anything with them. >> a ungroup says it believes hundreds of thousands of people are being displaced by the conflict -- a u.n. group says that. they are carrying out atrocities on the civilian population. >> they report to having witnessed executions, amputations, and large amounts of money are being offered to fight against the malian army and rebels. >> they are trying to deal with this, an influx of french soldiers. these men are one element of the international stabilization force including troops from a regional group. >> a prom
-led international support mission. france's objective is the full and entire implementation of the u.n. resolutions. >> nigeria is expected to increase the number of its soldiers to 1200 in the coming days. the problem is logistics and money. they say they need more international support if this is going to be a long-term set. the french president said very existence of mali would be under threat it did not act quickly. the problem is they are stuck now until a viable force can takeover. even if they take command, it is not likely they can defeat the rebels without french assistance. france's air superiority will be key in the battles ahead. the french said have carried out 70 air strikes since the conflict began. but any advancing force will need troops on the ground to siege the rebels in the north. more fighting in suburbs around the capital of damascus. active is reporting heavy shelling, with as many as 80 explosion saturday morning. the blasts followed several air strikes by government forces. government forces have been trying to retake the town from rebel fighters. >>> the u.n. organization
by north korea in december was made in china could influence u.n. security council discussions. the body is considering possible responses to the launch. south korea's military has analyzed debris from the rocket salvaged from the yellow sea. including a first stage fuel tank. sources say some of the debris appears to be from china and four other countries. u.n. resolutions ban member countries from exporting missile parts to north korea. many countries view the launch as a test of the north's long-range missile technology. china has traditionally defended the north at the security council. >>> u.s.-based group human rights watch has called on the united nations to look into abuses at north korea. parents of a japanese abducted by the north joined the appeal. the group's tokyo office chief has said the world has focused on the north's nuclear programs, not its human rights record and called on japan's government to lead efforts to launch a u.n. investigation. she was backed by the parents of a man who was abducted by the north in 1977 at the age of 13. >> translator: it is unacceptable.
against a u.n. security council resolution that condemns their recent missile launch. >>> prime minister netanyahu's right-wing coalition wins a narrow victory in israel's general election. a centrist party makes an unexpected strong showing. >>> welcome to nhk world "newsline." experts following the move buys north korea are watching the clock. they say it's only a matter of time before the country carries out another nuclear test. north korean leaders promised to boost their military power in reaction to a u.n. security council resolution condemning their recent rocket launch. security council members passed the resolution unanimously. it expands existing sanctions, adding four individuals and six organizations, including the space agency. assets will be frozen and the individuals will also face a travel ban. officials in pyongyang are showing defiance. >> this suggests north korean authorities are prepared to conduct a third nuclear tests following ones in 2006 and 2009. they also declared they will no longer recognize a joint statement in 2005 from the six party talks on their nuclea
in washington have announced the news. the u.n. has launched an investigation into civilian deaths from from strikes in a number of countries including somalia, pakistan, afghanistan, and yemen. the inquiry will look at 25 separate from strikes including a u.s. attack in pakistan in 2011 where up to 40 civilians are reported to have been killed. in syria today, war planes continued to bomb rubble-held areas near the capital as president assad was shown on television and attending a mosque service to mark the birthday of the prophet. every day, thousands of refugees to flee the violence. the strain on those trying to shelter them is enormous. we have been to a camp in jordan. >> small figures and a vast crisis. every night now, they come in their thousands. most are women and children, terrorized by war. for the children, how frightening is it? >> they keep screaming. they cannot sleep. they cry all the time. >> in the distance and in the country behind them, smoke rises from an explosion. on this side of the border, they meet soldiers to try to help, not kill. >> at each border crossing, or
war rages on. john ging says the u.n. will ask governments at upcoming donor conference to raise $1.5 billion in aid. >>> in addition to the 519 million for the four million people we decided as in need in syria, we also have a plan to respond to the refugees which now number over 650,000 in the neighboring countries. and that plan is costing $1 billion. >> ging spoke in new york after a mission to syria. he said the u.n. will make the request for aid after the donor conference in kuwait. he says the civil war has damaged infrastructure such as water, electricity and roads. he noticed people are in desperate need for food and medical supplies. he said relief goods are not reaching people who have fled to northern syria. ging demanded syrian leaders allow u.n. officials to enter the country from turkey. >>> myanmar's leader is on a visit to south korea. they met with the first woman to be elected president of south korea, park. the two female politicians encourage to do what they can for their respective countries. our seoul bureau chief reports. >> reporter: last year, aung san suu
the u.n. will ask governments at upcoming donor conference to raise $1.5 billion in aid. >> the 400 million people in need within syria, we also have a plan to respond to the refugees which now number over 650,000 in the neighboring countries. and that plan is costing $1 billion. >> ging spoke in new york after a mission to syria. he said the u.n. will make the request for aid after the donor conference in kuwait. he says the civil war has damaged infrastructure such as water, electricity and roads. he noticed people are in desperate need for food and medical supplies. he said relief goods are not reaching people who have fled to northern syria. ging demanded syrian leaders allow u.n. officials to enter the country from turkey. >>> emergency crews are on the ground in southern kazakhstan following a plane crash. russia's interfax news agency says the aircraft with about 20 people on board came down outside almaty, the country's largest city. the plane was reportedly flying from the north. interfax reports there were blizzards around the almaty airport and visibility was poor. they s
when you hear our next segment. former u.n. ambassador john bolton is here, that's next and in two minutes, a school principal turned home movie star and talk about dumb. he showed his starring role to his students and now he's in double trouble. we're going to see that video just two minutes away. using robotics and mobile technology, verizon innovators have made it possible for teachers to teach, and for a kid... nathan. tadpole. ... to feel like a kid again. because the world's biggest challenges deserve even bigger solutions. powerful answers. verizon. olaf gets great rewards for his small business! pizza! [ garth ] olaf's small busins earns 2% cash back on every purchase, ery day! helium delivery. put it on my spark card! [ pop! ] [ garth ] why settle for less? great businesses deserve great rewards! awesome!!! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? to take a centrum silver multivitamin every day. i told him, sure. can't hurt, right? then i hear
in the uprising that began in march of 2011. the u.n. refugee agency says nearly 100,000 refugees have escaped violence in syria in the last month alone, and there are more than 590,000 refugees, up from before. many of those people have escaped the jordan camp, where winter storms are making already difficult conditions worse. tents have been flooded. many people are stranded, and a big snowstorm is expected to hit very soon. >> the weather is so cold. they tell us if they give us heater's a tent may burn. you can see how bad it is. rain and cold and water seeps into our tents. you wake up at night and find yourself surrounded by water. >> we have no heaters. why have they left us stranded like this? our children are cold and sick. everyone is sick. >> tensions came to a head when refugees attacked aid workers as they distributed food. more from the jordanian capital of oman. >> aid workers in the refugee camps told us riots and scuffles broke out on tuesday when refugees were queuing for food handouts. we were told the refugees were very frustrated, really angry about the bad weather conditi
>> north korea threatens to carry out another nuclear attack just days after the u.n. condemns its rocket launch. hello. you're watching al his era live from doha. the united states plans to -- al jazeera live from doha. 60% of young people do not have a job, the unemployment rate at its highest in 40 years. plus -- >> in egyptian -- in a community in southern thailand, resisting pressure to find another new home. >> china is calling for calm and restraint after north korea said it is planning a new nuclear attack. the announcement was made days after the u.n. increased sanctions against north korea following a rocket launch last month. harry fawcett has more. >> if north korea's recent rocket launch was regarded as an act of defiance at the u.n., the security council resolution said that from peon yang reform p'yongyang there was more to come. >> we're not hiding from the fact that the various satellites and long-range rockets we will fire and the high-level nuclear test we will carry out are targeted at the united states. >> this was both a return to the kind of fiery anti-u.s. r
korea because of u.n. sanctions. french forces stepped up their offensive against rebels in mali. we are on patrol with them in the north. plus, why young people in cuba are playing with the idea of making music their career. we are getting reports of iraq that least five protesters have been killed in scuffles between the army and worshippers near the city of fallujah. thousands have been protesting for more than a month against the prime minister's government. they say the government promotes sectarian policies that discriminate against them. the latest violence began after the police. -- block protesters from entering the city. >> which call upon the army -- we call upon the army affiliated with iraq. if it is only loyal to the muslim nation and only belongs to the good land of iraq, to open the way for the scholars and people to give in to the city. they are not allowed to get in right now. the army has to be loyal to iraq. >> let's take some live pictures coming in from fallujah. the crowds are still swelling. a lot of sunnis and happy and calling for the government to be dissol
leaders promised to boost their military power in reaction to a u.n. security council resolution condemning their recent rocket launch. security council members passed the resolution unanimously. it expands existing sanctions adding four individuals and six organizations, including the space agency. assets will be frozen and the individuals will also face a travel ban. officials in the pyongyang are showing defiance. foreign ministry representatives issued a statement condemning the resolution as an attempt to deprive north korea of its right to launch a satellite for peaceful purposes. the document says it is now clear the u.s. has a policy of hostility toward north korea. as a result, it says the north will no longer recognize the joint statement from the six-party talks in 2005. that includes plans for the country to abandon all nuclear weapons and programs. the statement goes on to say north korean authorities will take practical steps to strengthen their defensive military power to cower pressure from u.s. sanctions. it says that includes nuclear deter represents. the wordin
the u.n. security council put in place. the u.n. resolution extends sanctions to four individuals and six organizations. they include the korean committee for space technology, that's north korea's space agency. their assets will be frozen. the individuals will also face a travel ban. the u.s. state department said they are adding the space agency and two related individuals to their sanction list. the u.s. treasury department black listed two beijing based representatives of a north korean bank and a hong kong based trading company. a spokesperson for the department said it's imposing further restrictions on entities that support the north's nuclear program. it wants to restrict the country's ability to use the international financial system for illicit purposes. north korean authorities responded to the united nations sanctions by announcing they will carry out a nuclear test of a higher level. now they are warning their southern neighbor counter measures if it takes part in the international clamp down. a north korean statement criticizes south korea for pressing other nations
on haiti, cholera inadvertently brought in by u.n. peacekeepers costing thousands of lives. is cholera still a threat today that's coming up. >> i will never stop saying thank you for thr, that you are doing and doing in my life. and i know god, i'm praying every day to help these people who are helping us and having these beautiful things happen in our lives. this is america. we don't let frequent heartburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people who gets heartburn and then treats day afr day... block the acid with prilosec otc and don't get heartburn in the first place! [ male announcer ] e pill eachmorning. 24 hours. zero heartbur and don't get heartburn in the first place! morning, boys. so, i'm working on a cistern intake valve and the guy hands me a locknut wrench. no way! i'm like, what is this, a drainpipe slipknot? wherever your business takes you, nobody keeps you on the road like progressive commercial auto. [ flo speaking japanese ] [ shouting in japanese ] we work wherever you work. now, that's progressive. call or click today. wow... good time at
in by u.n. peacekeepers costing thousands of lives. is cholera still a threat today that's coming up. >> i will never stop saying thank you for thr, that you are doing and doing in my life. and i know god, i'm praying every day to help these people who are helping us and having these beautiful things happen in our lives. >> we've been hit very hard and had an excellent meeting with the president and the prime minister and they were very specific about what they're trying to achieve. clearly their highest obligation is to get the necessities to the people who are living to clear the streets of the corpses, the very tragic job that has to be done and to begin working on the electricity, the transportation, the telecommunications, now, the nuts and bolts how they get up and going again. >> greta: that was secretary of state hillary clinton speaking to "on the record" right on the airport tarmac in haiti and that interview just six days after the 7.0 earthquake hit. now, immediately after the deadly january 2010 quake, the international community rushing in to help the devastated nation. but
been unable to meet the demands of the millions of syrians who require assistance. the u.n. is currently feeding some 1.5 million people in syria, but around 2.5 million are believed to be in need. on tuesday, a spokesperson for u.n. secretary-general ban ki- moon said aid workers have been unable to reach less than half of those requiring food aid. >> humanitarian partners continue to reach hundreds of thousands of people in syria. road closures, fuel shortages, and lack of access to conflict affected areas. since the beginning of january, the world food program has reached 800,000 people, and hopes to reach 1.5 million people with food distributions in syria this month. it is estimated 2.5 million people are in need of food assistance in syria. >> venezuela has delayed the third term swearing-in ceremony of president hugo chÁvez as he continues to receive medical treatment in cuba. chÁvez has been in cuba for nearly a month undergoing and recovering from his fourth surgery for cancer. on tuesday, the head of an as well as national assembly confirmed chÁvez is not well
than 60,000 people are known to have died in the syrian conflict. that is the assessment from the u.n. human rights chief. the figure is truly shocking. the violence is continuing into the new year as this report shows. >> on the outskirts of damascus. the footage shows up devastating government air strikes can be. we cannot show you the dozens of bodies burned or mutilated beyond recognition. the deaths as to a toll of 60,000. that is nearly 100 a day. the estimate is based on several sources over five months. the figure may still be low. >> it could be more. we have taken a statistical analysis of several casualties that exists and analyze them and removed all of the double counting. the criteria is quite strict. there may well be people have been killed who are not included as a result. >> the government is stepping up its campaign to push rebels away from the capital of damascus. shelling goes on across the country. men raced to get an injured child to a field hospital. there is reported to be intense fighting for control of the military air base. rebels are targeting the governme
on at the u.n. and in the history of the tree that prohibits coca around the world. my book started out as a children book. it started as a follow through children's book i did about marijuana in 2004, 2005. it was in a book about teaching kids how to smoke weed, but an educational book about how they might talk to their kids about a difficult subject with him i don't run into. so that's where the format is an illustrated picture book for kids. as i got into the subject and started looking into train, which is relevant to some children's lives. their children but pickett, families involved in the oppressive policies to eradicate coca and it's a social or cultural issue. as i got deeper into the history of coca and specifically with relationships of the coca-cola company, origins from a medical marvel to the drug problem we have today, it got really complicated and so now it's a book for adults. i also started in coca with coffee because they wanted to do a comparison is not in that fascinated me with the way the drugs, plants change their perceptions over time for the cultural perceptio
now? >> so much international pressure put on syria, especially by the u.n. arab league envoy brahimi who just last week was shuttling between syria and russia and then egypt. trying to forge some sort of path towards peace there to come up with some sort of a political solution. even the russians who had been the steadfast allies of the syrians, they have been perceived to be distancing themselves from the regime. recently, they called for all the parties in syria to come for a transitional government and everyone was waiting for assad to speak to see what he would agree to, if he would agree to a transitionalman a aal plan and out today and said, absolutely, he is not going to step down. a lot of the rhetoric we heard from today, we heard from the beginning of the uprising there. he even denied a resolution there and denied a fight going on between the government and the opposition saying only a fight between syria, the homeland there and its enemies. randi? >> denied a revolution, that is amazing. still no real solutions and in june when he spoke, he called for unity. but, you know
if the united nations and the audience of the u.n. convention were to treat coffee the way, with the contempt they treat coca, right? what would happen if they -- and they've told bolivians and peruvians you have to stop chewing coca which they've been doing for centuries, if not thousands of years. imagine if they did that to the united states, you know, coffee, you have to give up this habit now. what would happen? well, a friend of mine actually did this. he was a performance art major, andrew. he went to amherst college, and in 2001 he conspire with the the school administration and student government to secretly ban coffee or for one day without notice during finals week as a performance art project. so all these students get up in the morning, and there's no coffee in the cafeteria, bookstore, no coffee on campus. and they have friends dress up as drug dealers. buddy, you want to buy a shot of espresso for $6? and people were actually buying this. it made "the new york times," cbs news, all this kind of stuff. so that is the kind of outrage you would naturally expect if people told you
all of these miracles. the first u.s. team to reach haiti was dispatched to u.n. headquarters in after 10 hours of spying pulled out a hustonian otte guard with minor injuries. ban ki-moon called a small miracle. the supermarket where we have bought or 10-dollar boxes of cereal and the collapse of the hotel which had 200 people inside mostly foreigners when it fell. general keane who is the head of the u.s. military response would both quote the hotel montana at one time had 16 alone because of the number of people trapped there. the places were ordinary haitians lived and worked, schools, stores homes and offices with easily ghastly numbers inside god more attention. two days after the quake cnn's ivan watson watch the team of haitian rescue runs try to free an 11-year-old girl whose legs were penned under the concrete. it could reach her but they didn't have equipment to take her out. tiberi child her sunlit rates with powdered concrete whales when severing her leg. without blood for transfusion the invitation could kill her. watson his voice shaking told the anchor in atlanta on a n
's on the down slide, i'd say on the amount of international activities and u.n. forces are present, more than a peace keeping, watching mode, not doing anything particularly active. three years later it's hard to sustain momentum on any international effort at that amount of time. >> greta: coming up, america's doctors and nurses saving lives in haiti. medical professionals headed to haiti right after the quake and stayed long after. why should you care so much about haiti? those answers next. also, we're going to take you back inside the greta home and academy. you'll see how 80 hatian children are being educated and learning to love school. that's coming up. ♪ [ male announcer ] don't just reject convention. drown it out. introducing e all-new 2013 lexus ls f sport. an entirely new pursuit. we don't let frequent heartburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people who gets heartburn and then treats day afr day... block the acid with prilosec otc and don't get heartburn in the first place! [ male announcer ] e pill eachmorning. 24 hours. zero heartbur using cloud com
. the u.n. human rights office reported the number of dead has risen sharply over previous figures. we have a report narrated by alex thomson of "independent television news." some of the images may be disturbing. >> truly shocking. the words of the u.n. officials. syrians need no persuading of that. today, at least another 30 or so added to the death list. somebody fired into the petrol station. they'd have none here for four days. news was spreading fast that respliefs happening and the place was crowded. vulnerable human bodies... metal, concrete, fire, and high explosive. we can only show you a little of what took place here government jets were filmed apparently bombing suburbs as they do almost every day. activists blamed the government forces for the petrol station attack. but with the government restricting access to outside journalists, there's really no way of verifying who did what or why. it is the story of the syrian civil war. just last week, the same united nations left more or less wringing its hands, its diplomats saying talking is the only way out of this bleed stalem
think there's a psychological element. he wanted susan rice as secretary of state. >> u.n. ambassador. >> u.n. ambassador, and she was heavily criticized by various others and she withdrew her name and i think he was simply determined that he wasn't going to be pushed around again, that he was going to pick hagel and also he has a friendship with hagel that goes back. >> paul: to the senate days. >> for several years so i think it -- a lot of these decisions aren't just simply ideological or policy decisions, there's a personality. >> paul: do you think he wants a fight? >> i think he's had a fight, probably fight that he thinks he can win and calling over to the senate and house both. what is striking to me as well, hagel doesn't have experience in what he's tasked to do, running the pentagon. president obama involves we're not getting involved in syria or push too hard, his main job is to run pentagon. >> he was enlisted in vietnam, and distinguished service, two purple hearts and knows what it's like to be an enlisted man and fighting on the ground and have those people foremost in
to then sell to the u.n. security council. >> is there any indication that moscow is prepared, or moving toward the decision of putting its eggs in assad's basket is not the thing to do? are you seeing any shift in russia's position? >> i do not detect a shift in the position exactly. but what i do think what we're seeing is a change in the russian and of a court judgment as to whether or not president bashar al-assad is going to survive politically. until recently cannot -- until recently, the russian conclusion is that he would survive. i think they have come to a different conclusion of together. now is a question of whether the policy it lined up with the alico conclusion. >> you have been working on this. if assad had gone a year ago, would the future of syria be clearer, easier than if he is to go in the next six months, let's say? >> i really believe if president assad had cooperated with a managed, peaceful transition some time back, syria oppose the prospects would be much better than they are now. in -- serious prospects would be much better than they are now. in fact, a consensus was
for joining us from outside the house of commons in london. the u.n. refugee agency expects 700,000 people in mali to become displaced as the fighting intensifies. a growing international mission of trying to stop the advance of rebel fighters related to al qaeda troops have been deployed from the capital to heavy fighting reported in and around the rebel town. we have recently learned the army has taken that full control of one area. they will go north to reclaim the rebel-held territory. the first west african forces have arrived in mali. the forces from nigeria will join the contention of other nations. it will send at least 2000 soldiers over the next nine days. the army has secured a strategic bridge north of the capital with the help of the french. the bridge spans the river that separates the southern part of mali, still under government control, from the rubble-held north. mali forces are gathering near the central town held by rebel fighters. they are expected to launch further attacks against them of the fighting intensifies. the man stripped of seven titles has finally confirmed
they consider as recent gains against israel. fatah sees the recent upgrading the the of a status at the u.n. as a diplomatic coup. the mood is one of defiance against israel. >> today is when the palestinian revolution started, and the palestinian freedom started, and the military resistance started. it is a cheerful day for all the palestinian people. >> leaders on both sides made cautious gestures of reconciliation, with fatah and the palestinian authority members giving a recorded address. supporters used to be more likely to attack each other than celebrate together. the fact that hamas is allowing it to take place on its territory is a sign of some solidarity. al jazeera, jerusalem. >> it has been another day of fierce fighting in syria. these pictures, shot by activists, are said to show, an air strike. opposition activists are reporting government attacks in several suburbs of damascus. they say these pictures show the effects of an air strike. this is certainly what happened when fighter jets hit a suburb. al jazeera teams reached the outskirts of the capital. this is what they saw.
are brought in by both sides. that, as the president was expressing optimism over peace talks, the u.n. children's agency, unicef, is accusing his militias and rebels of using child soldiers. this general is deputy general secretary of the regional grouping of 10 states brokering peace talks. i put the unicef claims to him. >> war is expensive. child soldiers are cheap especially when they're hungry. we have information that children have been used by one side or the other but we can't confirm it. there have been many violations of human rights. >> no one surprised to hear those words on the streets of the capital. peace talks next week may have stopped the rebel march towards the city for now but few are convinced that a lasting peace can be achieved. a presidential adviser told me that talk of the rebels taking the city should be regarded as utter fiction but many people here think that is political spin. there is still a mood of fear and this is a country with a history of can you coup d'etatsd peace has been unattainable for decades. >> we have to end this with the rebels once and
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